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TTC’s largest union could go on strike as of June 7 | CBC News

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Some TTC workers could go on strike as early as June 7, says the union representing roughly 11,500 Toronto transit employees.

In a news release Tuesday afternoon, the ATU Local 113 said the Ontario Ministry of Labour has issued a no-board report — formal notice that the government is not appointing a conciliation board. 

That decision starts a 17-day countdown, after which point the members of ATU Local 113, the TTC’s largest union, can legally go on strike.

“This is the next legal step with respect to exercising our right to withdraw services,” said union president Marvin Alfred in the release. 

“We have already started mobilizing our members to prepare for this, should we need to take strike action in June,” Alfred said.

Both union and employer say they remain at the bargaining table and there won’t necessarily be a strike.

“However, we need to be honest with all our employees and customers,” said TTC CEO Rick Leary in a news release.

“Past experience tells us that if there is a labour disruption with ATU Local 113, there will be service impacts,” Leary said. 

He said exact service impacts are “not yet known.”

The ATU Local 113, which has been without a contract since April 1, says it was last on strike in 2008.

So far in 2024, the TTC says it has reached new agreements with three of the transit agency’s six bargaining units. 

Strike would mean ‘a lot of very upset people’: advocate

Transit advocate Steve Munro said he doesn’t think there’s an appetite for a strike on either side. 

“From the union’s part of view, unless they can somehow turn it around into, ‘We were forced to strike because of those terrible people at the TTC who are being completely unreasonable,’ unless you get the public on your side, they’re going to go downhill real fast,” Munro said.

Munro said there would be “a lot of very upset people very quickly” if there is a strike and it would affect people right across the city. It’s just not a downtown issue, he added.
 

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